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Purchase Card (PCard) Program

What is a PCard:

The UBC Purchase Card (PCard) is a ScotiaBank Visa corporate credit card that allows individuals to purchase UBC business-related items. To learn more about the PCard program download the handbook

Who can get a PCard: 

If your role or function requires you to make low dollar value purchases, you may be eligible to apply for a UBC PCard. A permanent University employee (full-time, part-time, or recurring term of regular employment status) can be a cardholder if authorized by the VP, Dean, Department Head or Director of their Department.

As of October 1st, to apply for a PCard you must read the PCard Handbook and Agreement and complete the PCard Quiz, available on Connect. Please follow the instructions to log onto Connect and navigate to the PCard Program.

Why to use a PCard:

The benefit of a PCard is a simplified purchase-to-pay process that improves efficiency.

When to use a PCard:

  •  paying for goods and services valued at $3,500 or less
  • paying for departmental supplies at UBC Bookstore

Every transaction must have a valid source document from the merchant. Following are some of the types of backup documentation that has been recommended by Internal Audit:

  • Receipt or invoice incl. card transaction slip from merchant
  • Packing slip with signed confirmation of goods received
  • Order confirmation receipt (eg. for dues, subscription, registrations)

All source documents should include the following information:

  • Merchant Name
  • Date of Purchase
  • Description and quantity of each item purchased
  • Total cost of order
  • Cardholder name

In the absence of original documentation a Lost Receipt form must be completed. 

Note on Records Retention:  Departmental Card Coordinators are required to designate filing space for UBC Purchase Card Statements for audit purposes. Records must be kept for seven (7) years (six plus the current year).

How to use a PCard:

  • familiarize yourself with PCard roles and responsibilities 
  • use your PCard in accordance to UBC policies and purchasing procedures, including Policy #122-Purchasing
  • reconcile transactions through Centresuit

Types of PCards available:

Type of Card Monthly
Limit
Transaction
Limit
Allowable / Exceptions
PCard $15,000 $3,500 All Vendors with excpetion of restricted vendors
Gas Card $2,500 $200 Only gas stations
PCard & Gas Card $15,000 $3,500 All vendors plus Gas Stations with exception of restricted vendors
Computer Card $15,000 $10,000 Only vendors for Computers, Stationery & UBC Bookstore

PCard Restrictions:

PCards can not be used for the following purchases:

  • personal purchases
  • cash advances, reimbursements
  • travel and entertainment expenses (i.e. transportation, accommodation and meals, including liquor)
  • donations
  • controlled substances 
  • live laboratory/research animals
  • maintenance contracts, equipment rentals exceeding 30 days (leasing of equipment is prohibited)
  • UBC departments, with the exception of UBC Bookstore where the card is accepted as a method of payment for departmental supplies
  • transactions over $3,500

PCard Contacts

The PCard team is comprised of Procure To Pay Client Services staff (part of the department of Payment & Procurement Services) and a team from Scotiabank, to ensure that the program runs smoothly and adapts to the University’s changing needs. We also help you manage your individual account in regards to lost cards, transactional inquires, declines and disputes.

For further information please contact UBC Procure To Pay Client Services at info.pps@ubc.ca

Scotiabank Customer Service (Scotiabank Call Centre) representatives provide 24-hour (and 7 days/week) telephone support to individual cardholders. For assistance call 1-888-823-9657.


a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

Payment & Procurement Services
TEF3-5th Floor, 6190 Agronomy Road
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3
Tel 604-822-2187
Email:

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